Thursday, June 17, 2021

Category: In The Media

Liberal Speaker Sue Hickey calls for Housing Tasmania to be restructured and downsized

The Liberal Speaker Sue Hickey has accused the state’s public housing provider of prejudice, failing its vulnerable tenants and of being an unfit landlord.

In a last minute submission to the Tasmanian Parliament’s housing affordability inquiry, Ms Hickey — who since being elected in March last year has proven to be a regular thorn in her party’s side — said Housing Tasmania had forgotten the “human element” of providing public housing resulting in people being treated poorly.

“Prejudice it appears has crept into the Housing Tasmania organisation whose culture is one of compliance above humanity, compassion and solutions,” she said.

Read the original article at www.abc.net.au

New housing service launched to help older women

Choosing the right real estate property, house or new home in a housing development or community
An innovative housing support service for older women who are at risk of experiencing homelessness has been launched on Thursday (8 August).

YWCA Canberra’s Next Door service, funded by a grant of $1.9 million from the ACT Government, will work with women aged 50 and over to find and maintain affordable appropriate and safe homes.

Chief Executive Officer of YWCA Canberra, Frances Crimmins said older women were the fastest growing cohort of people experiencing housing insecurity and homelessness.

Read more on RiotACT.

The History of Stereotyping Homelessness in Australia

Social Work Helper have published an article, “The History of Stereotyping Homelessness in Australia”

The article says, “The history of homelessness in Australia stems back to our nation’s colonization by our British counterparts which moved Indigenous Australians out of their physical living structures. As Australia became more industrialized nearing the 1970’s, the contrast between homelessness and the rest of society become starker as the mainstream society had higher living expectations and standards which solidified what the disadvantage looked like.”

Read the original article.

Tightening the divide between populism and public housing

The aftermath of the latest federal election result has evidently revealed one thing about our society, being the worldwide trend toward “populism” and its drifting distance away from progressive ideals and policy. (For example, see Brexit, the 2016 American Presidential election, and recent French and German elections.)

Prior to the election, there was potential for the expansion of 250,000 affordable properties that would have radically reshaped our housing landscape.

Boards, peak bodies and housing policy wonks are now rapidly convening, planning and adjusting to a future without any real significant increase in funding for affordable housing, and an election where a call for action on housing policy did not resonate with voters.

Read the original article at thefifthestate.com.au

Anembo Affordable Homes showcases the house you can build in three hours

A Queensland company is seeing a surge in demand for its flatpack houses that are erected in less time than it takes most people to put together an IKEA bunk bed.

The houses have become increasingly popular across parts of South East Queensland because of their relative affordability and the fact that erecting them is simple and fast, according to Steve Murray of Anembo Affordable Homes.

A two bedroom 60 sqm expandable home called The Valentine was just $58,200, he said, with the firm picking up orders for the new year in places like Russell Island where land was currently selling cheap at about $19,000.

Click here to read more.

Source: News.com.au

Generation Share: why more older Australians are living in share houses

An increasing number of older Australians are living in share housing. A relatively new group to emerge on the share-housing scene, they are choosing to share for financial reasons, but finding unexpected social benefits.

Share housing has traditionally been associated with student housing and media depictions of the share house as dysfunctional, chaotic, “He Died with a Falafel in His Hand” scenarios. But a growing number of older people are sharing housing.

This trend is part of the growth in share housing across an increasingly broad demographic as professionals aged in their 30s, 40s and onwards continue to share house or return to share housing into later life. Generation Rent is fast becoming “Generation Share”.

Discover the full article on The Conversation.

ACT Greens urge Labor to release housing strategy

The ACT Greens have called on their Labor colleagues to release the long-awaited housing strategy urgently, and detail how the government plans to provide more community housing in Canberra.

Greens planning spokeswoman Caroline Le Couteur called on Housing Minister Yvette Berry to release the strategy, after an Australian Institute of Health and Welfare showed Canberra continues to have the second-lowest proportion of community housing in the country.

It also comes as the proportion of public housing in the ACT has also fallen from 12.4 per cent to 7.1 per cent over a couple of decades, a trend reflected around the nation as Commonwealth funding has fallen and state housing agencies have been left without significant new investment for more public housing.

The city’s planning, development and housing sector has been waiting for the new strategy for several months, since stakeholders formally put forward their ideas in a summit late last year.

While the government pledged the new strategy during the 2016 election campaign, the strategy, if it is complete, has not been released.

Read the full article in the Canberra Times.

 

How can we prevent financial abuse of the elderly?

Throughout Australia older people are losing their savings, property and homes through financial abuse, usually at the hands of persons close to them such as an adult child or grandchild.

A sense of entitlement, ‘Inheritance impatience’ or opportunism can encourage people to ‘help themselves’ to an older person’s assets.

Elder abuse is not a new problem. It has been occurring in Australia and elsewhere for generations – but its only now that serious steps are being taken to address it.

While the extent of elder abuse in Australia is unknown, conservative estimates suggest at least 9% of older Australians suffer from financial abuse. However, we know that because of the hidden nature of the problem, the majority of cases go unreported.

Sadly, a majority of elder financial abuse occurs within families, and is defined as the illegal or improper use of a person’s finances or property by another person with whom they have a relationship implying trust.

Read the original article on The Conversation website.

Acclaim for Haven; Home, Safe program Sidney Myer Haven

A Bendigo-based housing and support initiative has received its fourth accolade in two years.

What can the Sidney Myer Haven program teach us about tackling homelessness?

MICHELLE Marschall’s eyes widened as she reflected on her first few months at the Sidney Myer Haven centre.

“Intense” was the word the 25-year-old used to describe the program, which couples affordable housing with education.

“It’s confronting to have to open up and take on board that they’re there to help you, not hurt you,” Michelle said.

But life has changed for the better since she decided to commit to the two-year initiative, based in Flora Hill.

She and her four-year-old son live in a place where they feel safe and supported.

They have made friends with the other residents.

And Michelle is working towards the goal she identified when she first moved into the centre – becoming a nurse.

Read the full article in the Bendigo Advertiser.

Heritage Listing Wrecks Affordable Housing Plan

MAYOR Bob Manning has denounced a mystery letter writer whose appeal to the Queensland Heritage Council scuttled plans to build a new affordable housing complex in Parramatta Park.

A single request from an unnamed resident has resulted in the Grove St pensioner cottages being placed on the heritage register.

Access Community Housing’s plan to replace the small 1950s-built cottages with about modern homes can no longer go ahead, despite Cairns Regional Council’s offer to retain two of the huts, move them to one side and refurbish them.

“Whoever the person was who lodged that submission, well done,” Cr Manning said.

“You’ve stopped what would have been a nice job creator for some of the smaller building contractors in Cairns, the ones who are doing it tough. Well done.

“That’s 30 couples who are going to be denied modern housing, close to the hospital, close to the public transport route, close to the CBD in a secure area.”

Read the full article in the Cairns Post.