Wednesday, December 08, 2021

Tag: Homelessness

Island homes: Tasmania election campaign offers few solutions to state’s housing crisis

Housing stress is at an all-time high in Tasmania, shutting out first-home buyers, squeezing the rental market and increasing homelessness

Before Sue Hickey entered state politics as a Liberal MP in 2018, she was Hobart’s lord mayor. Pledging to clean up public toilets and local politics, she also took a keen interest in the plight of people experiencing homelessness.

“You’d see these faces come out of nowhere,” Hickey says, recalling night tours of the city with food van staff and volunteers.

“You’d arrive, you wouldn’t see them, and then all these people just desperate for a sandwich and a Milo with five sugars would appear.”

Those outings were an eye-opener for Hickey, but for most Tasmanians homelessness and housing insecurity were out of sight, out of mind.

Hate Crimes Targeting Sydney’s Indigenous Homeless

On Wednesday 24 March, Michael*, an Indigenous man, was asleep on Eddy Avenue outside of Central Station when he was shaken awake. A friend urgently warned him that known intruders – “Black haters” wearing jackets adorned with swastikas – were on the way. Michael was not fast enough and, less than a kilometre from Surry Hills Police Station, was violently beaten.

Michael was not the only casualty that night. And that night was not the first that Sydney’s homeless were awoken to the reality of White supremacy while the rest of Australia’s eyes remained firmly shut.

Read the full story on Independent Australia website.

*Name has been changed.

Wollongong Homeless Hub joins national calls for a support package to help end rough sleeping

An Illawarra-based homelessness service has echoed national calls for a support package to help end rough sleeping. “Successful models such as Housing First used in countries like Finland show that ending homelessness is achievable and more than just a pipe dream,” Mandy Booker, manager of Wollongong Homeless Hub said.

Read the full article in the Illawarra Mercury.

The History of Stereotyping Homelessness in Australia

Social Work Helper have published an article, “The History of Stereotyping Homelessness in Australia”

The article says, “The history of homelessness in Australia stems back to our nation’s colonization by our British counterparts which moved Indigenous Australians out of their physical living structures. As Australia became more industrialized nearing the 1970’s, the contrast between homelessness and the rest of society become starker as the mainstream society had higher living expectations and standards which solidified what the disadvantage looked like.”

Read the original article.

Churches of Christ DigiAsk project changes the landscape of service provision for the homelessness

DigiAsk is a Churches of Christ Housing Services Limited initiative in partnership with Brisbane City Council. Using Churches of Christ’s mobile office (or DigiVan), the project is helping people experiencing homelessness – or those who are at risk of homelessness – to access technology and help.

Commencing in January 2018, DigiAsk has supported almost 500 patrons with digital advice and access to the internet. The service has also distributed reconditioned smart phones, sim cards and phone battery chargers.

Find out more on the Churches of Christ in Queensland website.

How can we prevent financial abuse of the elderly?

Throughout Australia older people are losing their savings, property and homes through financial abuse, usually at the hands of persons close to them such as an adult child or grandchild.

A sense of entitlement, ‘Inheritance impatience’ or opportunism can encourage people to ‘help themselves’ to an older person’s assets.

Elder abuse is not a new problem. It has been occurring in Australia and elsewhere for generations – but its only now that serious steps are being taken to address it.

While the extent of elder abuse in Australia is unknown, conservative estimates suggest at least 9% of older Australians suffer from financial abuse. However, we know that because of the hidden nature of the problem, the majority of cases go unreported.

Sadly, a majority of elder financial abuse occurs within families, and is defined as the illegal or improper use of a person’s finances or property by another person with whom they have a relationship implying trust.

Read the original article on The Conversation website.

Acclaim for Haven; Home, Safe program Sidney Myer Haven

A Bendigo-based housing and support initiative has received its fourth accolade in two years.

What can the Sidney Myer Haven program teach us about tackling homelessness?

MICHELLE Marschall’s eyes widened as she reflected on her first few months at the Sidney Myer Haven centre.

“Intense” was the word the 25-year-old used to describe the program, which couples affordable housing with education.

“It’s confronting to have to open up and take on board that they’re there to help you, not hurt you,” Michelle said.

But life has changed for the better since she decided to commit to the two-year initiative, based in Flora Hill.

She and her four-year-old son live in a place where they feel safe and supported.

They have made friends with the other residents.

And Michelle is working towards the goal she identified when she first moved into the centre – becoming a nurse.

Read the full article in the Bendigo Advertiser.