Wednesday, December 08, 2021

Hate Crimes Targeting Sydney’s Indigenous Homeless

On Wednesday 24 March, Michael*, an Indigenous man, was asleep on Eddy Avenue outside of Central Station when he was shaken awake. A friend urgently warned him that known intruders – “Black haters” wearing jackets adorned with swastikas – were on the way. Michael was not fast enough and, less than a kilometre from Surry Hills Police Station, was violently beaten.

Michael was not the only casualty that night. And that night was not the first that Sydney’s homeless were awoken to the reality of White supremacy while the rest of Australia’s eyes remained firmly shut.

Read the full story on Independent Australia website.

*Name has been changed.

4 key leadership skills for a post-COVID-19 workplace

Many organisations have realised the benefits of allowing employees to work remotely, and as a result, some of the global workforce may never return to the office. According to the PwC US Pulse Survey, 54% of CFOs indicated that their companies plan to make remote work a permanent option. That means managers may soon have to figure out the best way to manage teams that are partially remote.

Many of the traits that have always been important for managers — empathy, clarity, authenticity, and agility — are even more crucial during this time of uncertainty and upheaval. Leaders have been challenged to maintain connection and a sense of belonging within their teams even when they cannot be in the same room together. As leaders begin to stage the return to work, they have an opportunity to leverage new insights and advancements developed during the past several months to reimagine the workplace, rather than attempting a return to business as usual.

“We certainly don’t want to just snap back to the way we were before,” said Karen O’Duil, FCMA, CGMA, financial controller at Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne. “We want to build on this level of flexibility that accommodates everybody.”

My work-life boundary is totally eviscerated—but it’s also what’s kept me sane

Zoom call. Zoom call. Zoom call. Bathroom break. Bite to eat. Zoom call. Teams call. Then it’s a dash of real work, then open the door to my office for a breath of air. From there, it’s time to prepare for the next round of chaos: Two energetic toddlers, an equally tired-out wife, and an attention-seeking small dog. After preparing dinner, it’s a whirlwind two-hour rodeo of baths, books, and bedtime wrangling.

Of course, I’m unrealistically compartmentalizing what working from home during the pandemic is really like. But this is a reasonable enough approximation.

Queensland pensioners demanding government action on ‘unfair’ lifestyle village rent price hikes

Queensland pensioners living in lifestyle villages are demanding action from the government, following an extensive investigation into the multi-billion-dollar industry by 9News.

Residents claim park owners are unfairly jacking up their rents, while others allege big corporations are failing to honour their rental contracts.

“When you move into a village like this, you move in for retirement, you don’t move in to fight battles in QCAT or a court of law,” Paul Miller, a resident at Regal Waters in Bethania, said.

Read the original article on 9News.

Sydney’s biggest social experiment: The plan to turn Waterloo into a ‘world-class precinct’

Waterloo’s housing estate tenants are fighting the government’s attempt to erase the towers from Sydney’s skyline and to save their homes.

It was a hot, stormy day a week before Christmas in 2015 when Anna North ripped open an envelope that had landed in the letterbox of her apartment at a vast public housing estate in inner Sydney.

“Dear tenant, I am excited to write to you,” it read.

A new state-of-the-art metro train station was to be built in Waterloo, and the state government was seizing the opportunity to remake the sprawling 1970s estate, selling off valuable land in the city’s thriving inner south to developers.

Read the full story in SMH.

Wollongong Homeless Hub joins national calls for a support package to help end rough sleeping

An Illawarra-based homelessness service has echoed national calls for a support package to help end rough sleeping. “Successful models such as Housing First used in countries like Finland show that ending homelessness is achievable and more than just a pipe dream,” Mandy Booker, manager of Wollongong Homeless Hub said.

Read the full article in the Illawarra Mercury.

Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey: 2020

The 16th annual Demographia International Housing Affordability annual survey, presented by the e Urban Reform Institute and the Frontier Centre for Public Policy, covers 309 metropolitan housing markets (metropolitan areas) in eight countries (Australia, Canada, China [Hong Kong Only], Ireland, New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom and the United States) for the third quarter of 2019. Ninety-two major metropolitan markets (housing markets) are evaluated, including three megacities, with more than 10 million residents, New York, London and Los Angeles.

Download the full report.

Source: Demographia.com

Community Housing Sector Welcomes Low-Cost Funding Option

Community Housing Aotearoa (CHA) is welcoming the arrival of a low-cost funding avenue for community organisations working to provide good homes for New Zealanders.

Chief Executive Scott Figenshow says Community Finance will be a valuable addition to the range of funding options for community housing providers looking for capital to build homes.

“Access to capital and land are ongoing challenges for community housing providers so we are really glad to see the arrival of a company with strong connections in the sector and a commitment to the ethics and principles underpinning community housing,” he says.

Read the full article here.

Source: Scoop

Australian Housing Scheme Still Ambitious

It only took a relationship breakdown for one Victorian father to be forced into sleeping in his car or on a couch, while his children shared a room at his mother’s two-bedroom bungalow.

The daily routine of dropping off and picking up his two young children at school in the next town over from his mum’s made finding stable work challenging.

This hurdle was overcome when in 2018 the trio got a home with Habitat for Humanity, an international affordable housing organisation.

Read the full article in the North West Star.

Liberal Speaker Sue Hickey calls for Housing Tasmania to be restructured and downsized

The Liberal Speaker Sue Hickey has accused the state’s public housing provider of prejudice, failing its vulnerable tenants and of being an unfit landlord.

In a last minute submission to the Tasmanian Parliament’s housing affordability inquiry, Ms Hickey — who since being elected in March last year has proven to be a regular thorn in her party’s side — said Housing Tasmania had forgotten the “human element” of providing public housing resulting in people being treated poorly.

“Prejudice it appears has crept into the Housing Tasmania organisation whose culture is one of compliance above humanity, compassion and solutions,” she said.

Read the original article at www.abc.net.au